The Hudson Bay Project Team

Principal Investigators - still slogging in the tundra

Kenneth Abraham is a wildlife biologist and conservation manager working primarily in arctic coastal ecosystems and the Hudson Bay Lowlands. He continues to study brant, Canada and lesser snow goose populations as well as goose-plant interactions extensively within this region.  He also studies the ecology of a variety of shorebirds and sea duck species. He is very interested in developing methods for the rapid assessment of habitat damage. He is an Emeritus Research Scientist in the Wildlife Research and Development Section, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, and an Adjunct Professor at Trent University.
   
Rod Brook is a wildlife biologist examining the population dynamics and in community ecology of arctic breeding geese and ducks throughout the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and the Hudson Bay Lowlands. He is especially interested in developing fixed-wing based photographic systems to assess degradation and recovery of coastal tundra and boreal ecosystems.  He is a Research Scientist in  the Wildlife Research and Development Section, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources.
   
susan ellis-felege
Susan Ellis-Felege is a wildlife ecologist with broad interests in behavior, species’ interactions and community dynamics.  Her research uses state of the art tools for data acquisition including remote camera traps and videography as well as unmanned aviation vehicles (UAV’s) with multiple sensors. She has developed citizen science based programs to extract data from the images obtained and uses quantitative and spatial (GIS) tools to analyze the data.  She is an Assistant Professor at the University of North Dakota.
scott mcwilliams
Scott McWilliams is a nutritional and physiological ecologist whose interests center on wild vertebrates, with an emphasis on species of conservation interest.  He uses an integrative approach that combines work on metabolic physiology, membrane transport of nutrients, digestive physiology, nutritional requirements, feeding behavior, ecological energetics, and constraints on prey and predator form and function.  The goal is to understand how these traits jointly affect the animal’s ecology and influence community dynamics.  He is a Professor at the University of Rhode Island.
   
rf rockwell
Robert Rockwell is a population biologist whose interests have centered on population dynamics, lifetime reproductive success and genetic structure of arctic geese and ducks.  He has more recently focused his interests on the effects of climate change on the interactions of geese with their graminoid forage species and predators including grizzly and polar bears. He is also interested in the terrestrial foraging strategies of polar bears and how these are changing in the face of climate change. He  is a Professor at the City University of New York and the American Museum of Natural History.  
   
Kathleen UvinoDr. Kathleen Schnaars-Uvino is an ecologist with broad interests in both birds and plants.  She is interested in the recovery of habitat, severely degraded by destructive snow goose foraging and oversees our recovery ecology program.  She is also interested in the declines in avian insectivores and their population trends, behavior and niche requirements, at and beyond the historic range. She is currently examining this by providing and monitoring artificial nest boxes to tree swallows north of tree line. She has involved the Churchill community in the work as citizen scientists.  She is an Assistant Professor at the University of Jamestown.


in fond memory of Robert L. Jefferies

linda j. gormezanoin fond memory of Linda J. Gormezano


Collaborators of the Hudson Bay Project

Lise Aubry, Department of Wildland Resources, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322.

Evan Cooch, Department of Natural Resources, Fernow Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 USA

Brian Darby,  Department of Biology, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202

Markus Dyck, Department of Environment, Government of Nunavut, Igloolik, NU X0A 0L0 Canada

Kate Edwards, Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Corner Brook, Newfoundland A2H 6J3 Canada 

Milton Freeman, Canadian Circumpolar Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Jack Hughes, Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada, South Wing, Room 3624, 335 River Road, Ottawa, Ontario ON K1A 0H3 Canada 

Mike Johnson, North Dakota Game and Fish, 100 North Bismarck Expressway, Bismarck, North Dakota 58501 USA 

Dave Koons, Department of Wildland Resources, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322.

Peter Kotanen, Department of Botany, University of Toronto at Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga, Ontario, L5L 1C6, Canada. 

Jim Leafloor, Canadian Wildlife Service, 123 Main Street, Suite 150, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3C 4W2 Canada 

Erica Nol, Department of Biology, Trent University,  Peterborough, Ontario K9J7B8 Canada



The Hudson Bay Project Students and Research Team Members

andrew barnasAndrew Barnas, Biology Department, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202.  Andrew is a graduate student whose interests include the use of UAV's in monitoring nesting snow geese and eider ducks, the use of video recordings to evaluate the reaction of nest snow geese and eider ducks to predators and the use of molecular techniques to evaluate the local abundance and relatedness of polar bears.
   
 kim bennett
 Kim Bennett, Wildlife Research and Development Section, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, DNA Bldg., Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario K9J 7B8 Canada. Kim is a wildlife research technician with over 7 years of field experience working in the Hudson Bay Lowlands.  She has been involved with studies that include population monitoring and nesting ecology of Canada and lesser snow goose populations.  
   
 sam hervey  Sam Hervey, Biology Department, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202.  Sam is an undergraduate student whose interests include the use of UAV's in monitoring nesting snow geese and eider ducks,  the use of molecular techniques to evaluate the local abundance and relatedness of polar bears and the use of molecular techniques to estimate the levels of nest parasitism and extra pair bond copulation in snow geese and eider ducks.
   
dave iles Dave Iles, Department of Wildland Resources, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322. Dave continues to examine the dynamics of common eiders nesting in the Mast River and Wao Wao Creek in Wapusk National Park. He is especially interested in the impact of climate change on those dynamics.  Part of that impact is a shifting of predator loads and he is expanding that as part of his Ph.D. work, looking directly at impacts of polar and grizzly bears on common eiders and snow geese on the Cape Churchill Peninsula. 
   
frank uvino
 Frank Uvino, Broad Channel, NY.  Frank, using the helicopter to move lumber, is the facilities manager at the La Pérouse Bay Research Station.  He has overseen construction of our three new buildings and has made sure they have lights, heat and running water.  He is working towards making the facility more  ecologically friendly.  He makes the finest meat balls on earth. 
   
 chris witte  Chris Witte, San Diego, CA.  Chris is the chief naturalist on the Cape Churchill Peninsula.  He is a mainstay of our plant and avian survey work  - shown here during our boreal forest inventory work for Wapusk National Park.  He works on all apsects of the snow goose program.  He is also a skilled builder.  
   

revised 09/18/14