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Xenopus epitropicalis Fischberg, Colombelli, and Picard, 1982

Class: Amphibia > Order: Anura > Family: Pipidae > Genus: Xenopus > Species: Xenopus epitropicalis

Xenopus epitropicalis Fischberg, Colombelli, and Picard, 1982, Alytes, 1: 53. Holotype: BMNH 1982.462, by original designation. Type locality: "confluent de la Funa et de la Kemi, à 8 km au sud du centre de Kinshasa (Zaïre); altitude 350 m; 4° 18′ S, 15° 18′ E".

Silurana epitropicalisCannatella and Trueb, 1988, Zool. J. Linn. Soc., 94: 1-38.

Xenopus (Silurana) epitropicalisKobel, Loumont, and Tinsley, 1996, in Tinsley and Kobel (eds.), Biol. Xenopus: 21; Kobel, Barandun, and Thiebaud, 1998, Herpetol. J., 8: 13.

English Names

Southern Tropical Platanna (Channing, 2001, Amph. Cent. S. Afr.: 239).

Congolese Clawed Frog (Evans, Carter, Greenbaum, Gvoždík, Kelley, McLaughlin, Pauwels, Portik, Stanley, Tinsley, Tobias, and Blackburn, 2015, PLoS One, 10(12): e0142823: 23). 

Distribution

Highly provisional at this point due to confusion with Xenopus mellotropicalis: found definitely only around Kinshasas, Dem. Rep. Congo and northeast from there along the Congro River to near the confluence of the Kwa River and from Point Noire, Rep. Congo; likely into northeastern Dem. Rep. Congo; previous records from Cameroon and Gabon and Angola, likely attributable to other species. 

Comment

Xenopus epitropicalis is tetraploid (2n=40) with respect to Xenopus tropicalis (see Fischberg, Colombelli, and Picard, 1982, Alytes, 1: 53); although morphologically difficult to distinguish, these species also differ in mating call characteristics (Loumont, 1983, Rev. Suisse Zool., 90: 174). See account by Channing, 2001, Amph. Cent. S. Afr.: 239-240. Frétey and Blanc, 2001, Bull. Soc. Zool. France, 126: 379, included this species in their list of species from Gabon. Evans, 2008, Frontiers Biosci., 13: 4687-4706, provided a detailed discussion of phylogenetics and reticulate evolution. See account by Evans, Carter, Greenbaum, Gvoždík, Kelley, McLaughlin, Pauwels, Portik, Stanley, Tinsley, Tobias, and Blackburn, 2015, PLoS One, 10(12): e0142823: 51–). 

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