Click on thumbnail to enlarge

(all photos taken (c) Merlin D. Tuttle, Bat Conservation International, Inc.
unless otherwise noted)

All of these bat species have been captured at the SWRS pool or elsewhere on station grounds by Bat Conservation International staff who have been conducting training workshops for bat research and conservation at the Station since 1992.  See notes below thumbnails concerning newly described species.

Antrozous pallidus -- Pallid bat

Antrozous pallidus -- Pallid bat, closeup

Choeronycteris mexicana -- Mexican long-tongued bat

Corynorhinus townsendii -- Townsendís big-eared bat

Eptesicus fuscus -- Big brown bat

Idionycteris phyllotis -- Allenís big-eared bat

Idionycteris phyllotis -- Allenís big-eared bat, closeup

Lasiurus blossevillii -- Western red bat

Lasiurus blossevillii -- Western red bat, closeup

Lasiurus cinereus -- Hoary bat

Lasionycteris noctivagans -- Silver-haired bat

Lasiurus xanthinus -- Desert yellow bat

Leptonycteris yerbabuenae -- Lesser long-nosed bat

Myotis auriculus -- Southwestern myotis

Myotis californicus -- California myotis

Myotis melanorhinus -- Dark-nosed small-footed myotis

Myotis occultus

Myotis thysanodes -- Fringed myotis

Myotis velifer -- Cave myotis

Myotis volans -- Long-legged myotis

Myotis volans -- Long-legged myotis, closeup

Nyctinomops macrotis -- Big free-tailed bat

Nyctinomops macrotis -- Big free-tailed bat, closeup

Tadarida brasiliensis -- Mexican free-tailed bat

Pipistrellus hesperus -- Western pipistrelle

 

Leptonycteris yerbabuenae is a newly described species, formerly a sub-species of Leptonycteris curasoae (which was formerly a sub-species of Leptonycteris sanborni). Leptonycteris yerbabuenae is federally listed as Endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Myotis melanorhinus is a newly described species, formerly a sub-species of Myotis ciliolabrum (the western small-footed myotis).

Myotis occultus is a newly described species, formerly a sub-species of Myotis lucifugus, which has been found on the west side of the Chiricahuas near Chiricahua National Monument.

Myotis yumanensis, the Yuma myotis, has been found just north of Cave Creek Canyon near San Simon.